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HIPAA Eligible Individual: Your status once you have had 18 months of continuous creditable health coverage. To be HIPAA eligible, at least the last day of your creditable coverage must have been under a group health plan; you also must have used up any COBRA or state continuation coverage; you must not be eligible for Medicare or Medicaid; you must not have other health insurance; and you must apply for individual health insurance within 63 days of losing your prior creditable coverage. When you're buying individual health insurance, HIPAA eligibility gives you greater protections than you would otherwise have under state law.

Habilitative/Habilitation Services: Health care services that help you keep, learn, or improve skills and functioning for daily living. Examples include therapy for a child who isn't walking or talking at the expected age. These services may include physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and other services for people with disabilities in a variety of inpatient and/or outpatient settings.

Hardship Exemption: Under the Affordable Care Act, most people must pay a fee if they don't have health coverage that qualifies as "minimum essential coverage." One exception is based on showing that a "hardship" prevented them from becoming insured. More information will be available later in 2013.

Health Care Workforce Incentive: The use of incentives and recruiting to encourage people to enter into health care professions like primary care and to encourage providers to practice in underserved areas.

Health Coverage: Legal entitlement to payment or reimbursement for your health care costs, generally under a contract with a health insurance company, a group health plan offered in connection with employment, or a government program like Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Health Insurance: A contract that requires your health insurer to pay some or all of your health care costs in exchange for a premium.

Health Insurance Marketplace: A resource where individuals, families, and small businesses can learn about their health coverage options; compare health insurance plans based on costs, benefits, and other important features; choose a plan; and enroll in coverage. The Marketplace also provides information on programs that help people with low to moderate income and resources pay for coverage. This includes ways to save on the monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs of coverage available through the Marketplace, and information about other programs, including Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The Marketplace encourages competition among private health plans, and is accessible through websites, call centers, and in-person assistance. In some states, the Marketplace is run by the state. In others it is run by the federal government.

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO): A type of health insurance plan that usually limits coverage to care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO. It generally won't cover out-of-network care except in an emergency. An HMO may require you to live or work in its service area to be eligible for coverage. HMOs often provide integrated care and focus on prevention and wellness.

Health Plan Categories: Plans in the Marketplace are primarily separated into 4 health plan categories — Bronze, Silver, Gold, or Platinum — based on the percentage the plan pays of the average overall cost of providing essential health benefits to members. The plan category you choose affects the total amount you'll likely spend for essential health benefits during the year. The percentages the plans will spend, on average, are 60% (Bronze), 70% (Silver), 80% (Gold), and 90% (Platinum). This isn't the same as coinsurance, in which you pay a specific percentage of the cost of a specific service.

Health Reimbursement Account (HRA): Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRAs) are employer-funded group health plans from which employees are reimbursed tax-free for qualified medical expenses up to a fixed dollar amount per year. Unused amounts may be rolled over to be used in subsequent years. The employer funds and owns the account. Health Reimbursement Accounts are sometimes called Health Reimbursement Arrangements.

Health Savings Account (HSA): A medical savings account available to taxpayers who are enrolled in a High Deductible Health Plan. The funds contributed to the account aren't subject to federal income tax at the time of deposit.

Funds must be used to pay for qualified medical expenses. Unlike a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), funds roll over year to year if you don't spend them.

Health Status: Refers to your medical conditions (both physical and mental health), claims experience, receipt of health care, medical history, genetic information, evidence of insurability, and disability.

High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP): A plan that features higher deductibles than traditional insurance plans. High deductible health plans (HDHPs) can be combined with a health savings account or a health reimbursement arrangement to allow you to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses on a pre-tax basis.

High Risk Pool Plan (State): Similar to the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan under the Affordable Care Act, for years many states have offered plans that provide coverage if you have been locked out of the individual insurance market because of a pre-existing condition. High-risk pool plans may also offer coverage if you're HIPAA eligible or meet other requirements. High-risk pool plans offer health insurance coverage that is subsidized by a state government. Typically, your premium is up to twice as much as you would pay for individual coverage if you were healthy.

High-Cost Excise Tax: Under the Affordable Care Act starting in 2018, a tax on insurance companies that provide high-cost plans. This tax encourages streamlining of health plans to make premiums more affordable.

Home Health Care: Health care services a person receives at home.

Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS): Services and support provided by most state Medicaid programs in your home or community that gives help with such daily tasks as bathing or dressing. This care is covered when provided by care workers or, if your state permits it, by your family.

Hospice Services: Services to provide comfort and support for persons in the last stages of a terminal illness and their families.

Hospital Outpatient Care: Care in a hospital that usually doesn’t require an overnight stay.

Hospital Readmissions: A situation where you were discharged from the hospital and wind up going back in for the same or related care within 30, 60 or 90 days. The number of hospital readmissions is often used in part to measure the quality of hospital care, since it can mean that your follow-up care wasn't properly organized, or that you weren't fully treated before discharge.

Hospitalization: Care in a hospital that requires admission as an inpatient and usually requires an overnight stay. An overnight stay for observation could be outpatient care.

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