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COBRA: A Federal law that may allow you to temporarily keep health coverage after your employment ends, you lose coverage as a dependent of the covered employee, or another qualifying event. If you elect COBRA coverage, you pay 100% of the premiums, including the share the employer used to pay, plus a small administrative fee.

Cancelled Debts: If you incurred a debt from a loan or from buying something on credit and a portion of the amount you owe is discharged or forgiven ("cancelled"), the amount of the forgiven debt is generally counted as income to you.
For more information, see IRS Pub 17, ch. 12.

Capital Gains: A capital gain is the amount you get from selling property, like stock or a house. For example, if you buy stock for $1,000 and sell it for $1,250, you have capital gain of $250. You don't need to include a capital gain if it's from the sale of your main home you owned for at least 5 years (and the profit is less than $250,000).
For more information see IRS Pub 17, ch. 14, pg. 104 or IRS Pub 544.

Care Coordination: The organization of your treatment across several health care providers. Medical homes and Accountable Care Organizations are two common ways to coordinate care.

Catastrophic Health Plan: Health plans that meet all of the requirements applicable to other Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) but that don't cover any benefits other than 3 primary care visits per year before the plan's deductible is met. The premium amount you pay each month for health care is generally lower than for other QHPs, but the out-of-pocket costs for deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance are generally higher. To qualify for a catastrophic plan, you must be under 30 years old OR get a "hardship exemption" because the Marketplace determined that you're unable to afford health coverage.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS): The federal agency that runs the Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs, and the federally facilitated Marketplace. For more information, visit cms.gov.

Certified Applicant Counselor: An individual (affiliated with a designated organization) who is trained and able to help consumers, small businesses, and their employees as they look for health coverage options through the Marketplace, including helping them complete eligibility and enrollment forms. Their services are free to consumers.

Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP): Insurance program jointly funded by state and federal government that provides health coverage to low-income children and, in some states, pregnant women in families who earn too much income to qualify for Medicaid but can't afford to purchase private health insurance coverage.

Chronic Disease Management: An integrated care approach to managing illness which includes screenings, check-ups, monitoring and coordinating treatment, and patient education. It can improve your quality of life while reducing your health care costs if you have a chronic disease by preventing or minimizing the effects of a disease.

Claim: A request for payment that you or your health care provider submits to your health insurer when you get items or services you think are covered.

Co-op: A non-profit organization in which the same people who own the company are insured by the company. Cooperatives can be formed at a national, state, or local level and can include doctors, hospitals, and businesses as member-owners. Co-ops will offer insurance through the Marketplace.

Coinsurance: Your share of the costs of a covered health care service, calculated as a percent (for example, 20%) of the allowed amount for the service. You pay coinsurance plus any deductibles you owe. For example, if the health insurance or plan's allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and you've met your deductible, your coinsurance payment of 20% would be $20. The health insurance or plan pays the rest of the allowed amount.

Community Rating: A rule that prevents health insurers from varying premiums within a geographic area based on age, gender, health status or other factors.

Competitive Bidding: Open bidding for federal contracts between independent groups that compete for the contract by providing the best bid.

Complication of Pregnancy: Conditions due to pregnancy, labor and delivery that require medical care to prevent serious harm to the health of the mother or the fetus. Morning sickness and a non-emergency caesarean section aren’t complications of pregnancy.

Conversion: The ability, in some states, to switch your job-based coverage to an individual policy when you lose eligibility for job-based coverage. Family members not covered under a job-based policy may also be able to convert to an individual policy if they lose dependent status (for example, after a divorce).

Coordination of Benefits: A way to figure out who pays first when 2 or more health insurance plans are responsible for paying the same medical claim.

Copayment: A fixed amount (for example, $15) you pay for a covered health care service, usually when you get the service. The amount can vary by the type of covered health care service.

Cost Sharing: The share of costs covered by your insurance that you pay out of your own pocket. This term generally includes deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments, or similar charges, but it doesn't include premiums, balance billing amounts for non-network providers, or the cost of non-covered services. Cost sharing in Medicaid and CHIP also includes premiums.

Cost Sharing Reduction: A discount that lowers the amount you have to pay out-of-pocket for deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. You can get this reduction if you get health insurance through the Marketplace, your income is below a certain level, and you choose a health plan from the Silver plan category (See Health Plan Categories). If you're a member of a federally recognized tribe, you may qualify for additional cost-sharing benefits.

Court Awards: Money that's due to you as the result of a lawsuit. This money may be taxable. Examples of lawsuit proceeds that aren't taxable are amounts awarded to you for personal physical injury or sickness and an amount you get as compensation for damages to your property if the payment is less than the amount you paid for the property. Payments to compensate you for lost wages or punitive damages awards are examples of taxable court awards.
For more information, see IRS Pub 17, ch. 12.

Creditable Coverage: Health insurance coverage under any of the following: a group health plan; individual health insurance; student health insurance; Medicare; Medicaid; CHAMPUS and TRICARE; the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Indian Health Service; the Peace Corps; Public Health Plan (any plan established or maintained by a State, the U.S. government, a foreign country); Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) or a state health insurance high risk pool. If you have prior creditable coverage, it will reduce the length of a pre-existing condition exclusion period under new job-based coverage.

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